Solar System|lupus Systems Tutorial ‘The Last Five Minutes’: How the House voted to approve the Iran sanctions package

‘The Last Five Minutes’: How the House voted to approve the Iran sanctions package

A House vote on Wednesday to approve legislation to block President Donald Trump from lifting sanctions on Iran was a major setback for the White House, which had hoped to use the vote to force the Senate to pass a compromise legislation.

The measure, which passed 227-217, does not contain language that would stop Trump from making an override by the end of the week, though it still does not include the full package that Senate leaders are looking to put on the floor.

The legislation still needs the support of at least seven Republicans, including Sens.

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Democrats were optimistic the measure could win enough Republican votes to pass with bipartisan support, but it fell short.

They have not yet announced a position on the legislation, but Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer Charles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerCotton says he will consider holding Kavanaugh committee vote this week Trump slams Schumer: ‘Go f— yourself’ The Hill’s Morning Report — Kavanaugh ordeal thrusts into broader political spotlight MORE (D-N.Y.) said Wednesday that the measure “wouldn’t be a great vote” if it didn’t include a resolution to override the Senate vote, but added, “it is not a great legislative vote.”

Democrats are expected take the lead on the bill once they have a vote from the Republican-controlled Senate.

“The bill is going to be a little bit more complicated than it should be,” Schumer said on CNN.

It’s going to have to be on Thursday, but we will try to get it on Thursday. “

We are going to get the vote.

The measure would prohibit the Trump administration from lifting the sanctions unless the Senate approves a measure to give Congress 60 days to come up with a new resolution. “

So we are going after the votes, but hopefully we will be able to do it this week.”

The measure would prohibit the Trump administration from lifting the sanctions unless the Senate approves a measure to give Congress 60 days to come up with a new resolution.

If that fails, the president would have 60 days in which to override any sanctions.

Trump’s order would immediately cease U.S. sanctions on the country, with a one-year extension for Iran to comply.

That would put the administration on the hook for $1.8 billion in payments Iran makes to U.N. agencies and banks.

Trump and congressional leaders said they would work to ensure Iran does not get those payments, as well as other measures the administration has announced to help ease the financial pressure on Tehran.

The sanctions are being implemented to help reduce Iran’s nuclear program, but they also seek to force Tehran to curb its nuclear weapons ambitions.

The Treasury Department said in April that it was planning to release $1 billion to Iranian banks that were part of the U.A.E. sanctions package to help defray the cost of those payments.

Congress also approved legislation in August to provide $3 billion in additional funds to the International Atomic Energy Agency, to help combat the spread of the deadly coronavirus.

The administration said in February that it would not seek to lift sanctions on Tehran until it had completed the IAEA assessment, but Trump has repeatedly said he would do so.

In April, the Treasury Department and State Department announced they would jointly certify that Tehran had met its obligations in its international nuclear cooperation agreement with the United States.

The United States, the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Russia and China have all formally agreed to the deal.

Iran has been in violation of the deal, which expires at the end-of-the-year, since the end, and its leaders have repeatedly said they will not abide by it.

The White House said in May that the U-turn on the nuclear accord was a sign of weakness and could prompt more U.K. ministers to call on their allies to take more action against Iran.

In July, Trump threatened to “totally destroy” the deal unless the U